JiG is on Patreon and Needs You! Click here for more information

June 2004 Archives


  • Currently 4.4/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4.4/5 (251 votes)
Comments (68) | Views (8,096)

The TelephoneHere's a stylish and unusual game, simply called The Telephone, created as a university project by Michael Clague. In it you embark on an adventure by dialing in destinations. The destinations are 3-digit telephone numbers that you find in each 'level' that take you to the next. Each destination is unique in its objective, sound, and interface. For example, one destination requires you to win a game of rock-paper-scissors 3-times to advance to the next. It's a very simple premise for a game; one that allows for a free-form expression of creativity and art: And it works.

Reader reviewThe following is a reader-submitted review by Yukito (6/09): The Telephone is a rather old and short point-and-click 'adventure'—somewhere in between an escape-the-room puzzle and a webtoy. It's rather hard to pigeonhole into a single category.

That being said, The Telephone, as short as it is, provides some unique and different puzzles. As with most interactive art pieces, discovering the rules oneself is the whole point of the game.

Beginning with nothing in front of you save an old rotary telephone, you are asked to call into hidden worlds, each world providing you with a new telephone number—a new world to call.

While some of the puzzles are easier (the right word might be "straightforward", as the easiest puzzle is also entirely luck based) than others, all of the are doable with a little clicking and a little patience.

The most interesting aspect is that, while the game has a linear progression, if one knows a number (or tries random ones) they can skip over worlds to a section they like, or do any of the worlds in any order.

The art itself is the best part of the game. From paper cutouts, to photographs, to brush paintings, each world has it's own unique style.

The Telephone may be short, but it is a nice little escape.

Play The Telephone


  • Currently 4.6/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4.6/5 (101 votes)
Comments (51) | Views (9,321)

Micro Life is quite easy to play, and it has a lot of charm to compensate for the relatively light challenge it presents. Accessible to all ages, but probably designed for a younger audience, the game appears on the BBC's website for children. But that's no reason to ignore this cute little Flash game with exceptional graphics and an overall design that has lots of potential.

Interestingly, the game looks and functions very similar to projects that come out of the "turtles" project at RIT in the course Programming for Digital Media: Students write scripts to cause intelligent autonomous agents to interact with each other, thereby creating a simulation of sorts.

This game is one part simulation, one part strategy, and one part Insaniquarium. Mix them all up and you get... Micro Life.

Play Micro Life


  • Currently 4.6/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
(4 votes) *Average rating will show after 20 votes
Comments (1) | Views (3,776)

Chris Hilgert has finished yet another game in his YetiSports series of Flash games; this one features a flamingo, and of course the penguin obliggato. The object of the game is to hit the penguin as far as you can while avoiding obstacles such as an elephant, a giraffe, and a tree. For best results, don't hit it too high, and use the obstacles to your best advantage whenever possible.

Play Flamingo Drive


  • Currently 4.3/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4.3/5 (448 votes)
Comments (111) | Views (13,771)

I came across this version of the original Prince of Persia game recreated in Flash, and wanted to share it. The original game, created by Jordan Mechner and released in 1989, used an animation technique called rotoscope to give the characters human-like qualities. It was also a lot of fun to play. This special Flash edition isn't quite the whole experience, but you should be able to at least get a taste of what the original was like.

Play Prince of Persia


Comments (2) | Views (3,073)

WeboggleFor anyone who missed it the first time around, and because I'm up to my gonads in papers to write for the summer quarter and too busy to post something new right now. And besides, it's a really great multiplayer game that's easy to play, and that can help you increase your word power—even if that means being able to rattle off 3-letter words like there's no tomorrow. Click.


  • Currently 4/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4/5 (27 votes)
Comments (11) | Views (5,352)

Here is another classic that needs no introduction for many: Duck Hunt. Released for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in 1985, the original Duck Hunt came on the same cartridge with another classic video game: Super Mario Bros. Duck Hunt was one of the first home console games to utilize a light gun to shoot at the television screen.

Written in Flash by Johnny Slack, an interactive multimedia technology student at Purdue, this version of Duck Hunt uses the mouse for aiming and shooting. It looks, acts and sounds just like the original (though it offers only one mode of play). Very nicely done.

Play Duck Hunt


  • Currently 4.6/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4.6/5 (30 votes)
Comments (33) | Views (9,757)

Conqueror!Today I learned of this full-featured, multiplayer, turn-based strategy game developed in Shockwave. It's called Conqueror, created by Blip Amalgamated Internet Pleasureworks. Although Conqueror! is very similar to Risk, its gameplay is a lot richer. Instead of armies alone, each territory has a peasant population that can produce both gold and soliders. However, if you don't tend to their needs, they can also rebel against you. It's all handled through a system of influence you maintain over each of your territories—such as sending diplomats, developing culture, and building fortifications—you either increase your control over the country, or chance losing it from neglect.

Here's what their website says of the game:

"Conqueror is a turn-based, multiplayer strategy game that takes place on a map of medieval Europe. Play on the web against as many as 16 human or AI opponents, for games as short as 30 minutes or as long as 4 hours. An ingenious system of simultaneous turns means that you don't have to wait for other players to make their moves!"

The graphics are really superb and the sound effects add a nice subtle touch that addresses the medieval theme of the game. Although the site says the game is still in beta release, I was able to play the game for over 3 hours without a major problem. This is an excellent game for anyone interested in turn-based strategy games.

Play Conqueror!


  • Currently 4.6/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
(4 votes) *Average rating will show after 20 votes
Comments (6) | Views (3,266)

Crimson Warfare is a real-time strategy game in... Flash! I couldn't believe it when I saw it, but it truly is an RTS in the genre's most basic form. The gameplay mechanics are quite simple: you decide which buildings you'll need—one type gathers resources (money) and another allows you to build two types of soliders and an armored vehicle. There's even a background story which sets up each campaign that is very reminiscent of a Blizzard RTS game. While Crimson Warfare is a far cry from Warcraft or Age of Empires, this is one Flash game that is an impressive use of the web-based medium.

Play Crimson Warfare


(8 votes) *Average rating will show after 20 votes
Comments (15) | Views (4,110)
Cube gameAnother puzzle game, this time from the Netherlands. This one is a new spin on the Rubik's cube genre, if there is such beast, and it's called Sloyd (I think they could have come up with a better name, although I have no idea what Sloyd means in Dutch). Anyways, I just found this game and it looked nicely executed as well as fun to play (I solved it in 198 moves—I suspect that's probably below average). Also, check out the other games at their site. Something to keep you busy while I study my Japanese. Situree-simasu.

Play Cube game