Locked Around the Clock


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Rating: 3.5/5 (84 votes)
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Weekday Escape

elleDo you enjoy escape-the-room games but feel as if you haven't been challenged lately? Are you feeling too familiar with the usual genre antics? Then it's time for something a bit different, a little difficult, and exceedingly engaging in SuzumeDr's escaping puzzler, Locked Around the Clock.

Locked Around the ClockYou begin with the typical escape game premise: you are locked in a room and need to get out. To do so, search about the room for any clues, puzzles, objects and contraptions that might contain the key to your freedom. When you do find something inspection-worthy, be sure to examine it from every angle, if possible, as there are many areas of interest in this game. Inventory use and navigation is, for the most part, intuitive yet some will bemoan the lack of a changing cursor as a few areas will feel too "clicky" or pixel-hunt prone.

The visuals, adherence to theme and riddling clues seem absolutely characteristic of SuzumeDr's style. As in Triangle and To Nothing, once you get the hang of how things work around this place, keeping in mind that all the puzzles are clock themed, you'll be able to click into the logic and appreciate the creative cunning behind each brain teaser even if they seem to initially make no sense and give you a rough time starting out. There is a payoff to sticking it out, though. If you do feel stumped, utilize the save function and take a break to recharge. Once you get a contraption to function, SuzumeDr's peppy presentation makes the effort feel all the more rewarding. So go ahead and get yourself Locked Around the Clock—it's a fun escape well worth your time.

Play Locked Around the Clock

Walkthrough Guide


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Locked Around the Clock Walkthrough

The First Time Around

  1. You'll start facing the door, which is of course locked. Beside it is a panel which doesn't do anything... and apparently needs a key or something, which you don't have.

  2. To the left is a picture of a club that you can't do anything with, and below that is a chest of drawers. The first and third drawers down are locked, one with a key, the other with a code. The second and fourth drawers are empty.

  3. Hang on. The second drawer's rim looks unusually thick on one side. Look to the left of the drawers and open the second drawer from there to get your first inventory item, a remote control. Examine it and turn it over (click near its lower right) to see that it's missing a battery.

  4. Enough of this view; back away if necessary and turn right. You'll be facing a shelf with nine sections, as well as a wastebasket and two odd notches in the wall. The notches are insignificant for now, and there's nothing in or behind the wastebasket for now.

  5. So let's check the cabinets. The upper-left shelf contains a cup containing a ruler, pen, and pencil, and there's a spade marked on it. The cup is hexagonal, and so is the pencil; I'm going to go out on a limb here and say they're related. Check the flat end of the pencil for a number; write it down as the "spade number".

  6. The upper-middle shelf contains a U-shaped pipe with something stuck in it. You can look above it to see a pair of holes that lead to the pipe, but you can't do anything with them yet.

  7. The upper-right shelf contains some sort of piston, and something to the right. Click to look on the right side and see a button; when you press it, the screen shakes. It must make the piston slam down or something.

  8. The middle-left shelf's door is locked with a code you don't know yet. The middle shelf contains an alarm clock with Roman numerals (and no, you can't take the batteries from it for the remote; don't ask me why).

  9. The middle-right shelf contains the area under that piston from the upper-right shelf; it looks like it slams down to cut something that fits in that rectangular notch.

  10. The lower-middle shelf has a key you can't get do due to the glass protecting it. The lower-left and lower-right shelves contain irrelevant decorations.

  11. We've had enough fun with the shelves, so turn right again. There's a closet, which is locked with a strange-looking padlock. Something with a very particular shape must go in there.

  12. One more turn right and you'll be facing a cabinet with a TV on it. Underneath it are two drawers, a weird blue cylinder, and a cabinet that's locked with a four-digit code. One drawer contains a block of wood; the other is empty.

  13. Turn right again and you're facing the door again. Alright, it's time to stop staring at these puzzles and start solving them!

The "In Japan" Drawer and the U-Shaped Tube

  • Let's take another look at the third drawer. "in JAPAN", three numbers, and "S-U-N". Try one of the letters and you'll find there are five choices: W, U, N, E, and S. Four of those are the four compass directions!

  • Now, the numbers. 7, 13, and 17 (the order can vary from game to game, but those are the numbers). Since this room is supposed to have a clock motif and the numbers don't go above 24, I'm going to guess they represent 24-hour times of day: 7 A.M., 1 P.M., and 5 P.M.

  • In the morning, the sun is to the east, and at late afternoon it's to the west. Since Japan is north of the Equator, the sun will be to its south at midday. That means 7 = E, 13 = S, and 17 = W.

  • If you did it right, you'll crack open the drawer and get an air pump. What can we do with this? I've got an idea. Go to the U-shaped tube in the top-middle shelf, look at it, and stick the air pump in the right hole. A good puff of air will send the tube's blockage flying.

  • Look behind the wastebasket by the shelf; it landed there. Take the capsule, open it, and retrieve the battery inside.

  • The TV and the Middle-Left Shelf

  • Now that you've got a battery, put it in the remote. Then, use said remote on the TV. You can press the four white buttons on the remote to view four different channels.

  • Huh? Each channel is a sequence of Roman numerals. If you trace them as paths on the face of the alarm clock on the shelf, they'll spell out shapes. "XII XII" is a special case; it means a circle.

  • Once you've deduced the four shapes, copy them to their corresponding positions on the door on the middle-left shelf. You should then be able to open it, revealing some sort of blue hook-thing. That stretches at both ends.

  • Turn over the blue hook-thing (click near its lower left edge) to see a heart. Stretch it at both ends again to see two digits; record them as the "heart number".

  • Making a Key for the Closet Lock

  • Go back to that middle-right compartment in the shelf of nine. The block of wood fits in that nook neatly, and I'd say the piston is supposed to cut it.

  • Go to the upper-right compartment, then hit the button to make the piston do its job. Go back to the middle-right compartment and retrieve your newly cut wood block.

  • I think I've seen something that shape will fit into. Go to the closet and use the wood block on the lock. Open sesame!

  • Inside the Closet

  • Now that you've got the closet open, take a look inside. It contains a few things of interest. That thing on the floor is the lock you just cracked open, but it's not important. Do, however, note the weird hole up above it.

  • Pull the white lever on the left to see the club picture on the opposite wall raise, revealing a cord and another number. The problem is that the lever doesn't stay down. Record the number, though, as the "club number".

  • There's also that diamond-shaped hole in the lower right, but you need something to use with it. The last thing worth noting here is that purple box, which contains a somewhat frustrating puzzle.

  • Here's how it works: each button moves two of the hands. The yellow hand always moves two steps clockwise with each press of its color, while the other two moves one step each. Your goal is to get all three hands to point at the top at the same time.

  • Here's a good strategy: use the red-yellow or blue-yellow button until the red and blue hands overlap, then press both of those buttons alternatingly until yellow is at the goal and red and blue are still overlapping. Then simply use the red-blue button until everything falls into place.

  • Once you get it, something should pop out of the side of the box. Check it out; it's a... pulley?

  • The Pulley and the Four-Digit Puzzle

  • The pulley goes in those two notches above the nine-compartment shelf. When you put it in place, a piece of paper will pop out. Three card suits plus a bunch of green and white lines equals...? That's weird.

  • Let's start with the card suits. By now you should have learned two one-digit numbers and a two-digit number corresponding to the suits. Put them in the order given on the paper and enter them on the door below and to the right of the TV.

  • That's not the combination, but it'll help visualize the next step. You need to add and subtract segments from those digits according to the green and white lines to turn the four digits into four new digits. Green means add, white means remove. Don't over-think it.

  • Once you've got your four new digits, input them and hit the ENTER button to open the door.

  • Winch Witchery

  • Inside the four-digit door you'll find a button. Hit it to make the blue cylinder turn. A key will fall out of it, so nab it. The key goes to the top drawer under the spade picture; you'll find a crank handle inside.

  • The crank handle goes to the diamond-shaped hole in the closet, which makes a rod slide out under the lever. Use the blue hook-thing (the one you got the heart number from, remember?) to secure the lever to the rod so it'll stay down.

  • Go back to the club picture and grab the cord that was behind it. This is the final piece to a puzzle you've been solving this entire time. Go use it on the blue cylinder, the pulley, or the holes above the U-shaped tube and the rest will be the done in a cutscene.

  • Once you're done admiring your handiwork, slap the button next to the blue cylinder to winch up the nine-compartment shelf. Then you can take the key underneath.

  • Clocking Out

  • The key goes to the panel by the door... revealing a set of arrowheads and a number. If you experiment, you'll see how this works: you're given a series of numbers and have to choose a direction for each one until the panel decides whether you've passed or failed.

  • Obviously, the clock motif is present her as well. Here's the trick: put a : into the number to make it look like a time, visualize that time on an analog clock, and pick the arrowhead that most resembles it. For instance, suppose the number is 725. When an analog clock reads 7:25, the hour hand is pointing down and left, and the minute hand is pointing down and right. Together they look like the up-pointing arrow, so hit it.

  • Once you get a perfect score on Locked Around the Clock's final exam, the door will open and you'll be free to leave. Victory!

  • 48 Comments

    I knew when this game loaded it would be one of those that I'd be stuck right off the bat. I've found

    a wooden block, which I've put into the slot in the cabinet, but don't know how to move the press above it.

    I have a feeling that I'm supposed to be able to decipher the "In Japan" clue on the drawer, but I'm clueless.

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    neo1973: Click over to the right side of the slot above it while zoomed in. You should spot a button on the side.

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    Anyone have any luck finding clues to the 4-shapes lock?

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    ty. should get me started, I hope

    @onyx
    the clue for the four shape thingy is

    on the tv. you need the remote

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    nerdypants Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 12:54 AM

    No luck with that one, Onyx Mouse, I'm stuck at the puzzle in the closet. It's exactly the sort of thing I'm horrible at.

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    Not getting the "In Japan" thing. Even with the clue given above.

    Assuming the letters correspond to the four compass directions and "Up", it seems like it ought to be U-W-E.

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    nerdypants Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 1:02 AM

    Tenzhi:

    The U is just to give you the "SUN" hint. Go by the compass directions.

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    Well, that stinks. Any hints on how to find

    the remote? I imagine it'll need batteries as well, since I found one earlier.

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    @ onyx

    have you tried the side of the filing cabinet?

    if thats not enough, then

    have you opened the drawers from the side view of the cabinet?

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    Ah. I'd looked at it from that angle, but hadn't tried that...thanks!

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    Ugh. In the closet lies a type of puzzle I detest.

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    Stuck on digital puzzle with pink clue...

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    nerdypants Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 1:20 AM

    I'm having trouble with the four-digit puzzle as well.

    I can't seem to find the heart.

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    I couldn't find the heart either, nerdypants, but with the clues I had available I was able to figure out 3 of the 4 digits and just brute-force the combination.

    Now I just gotta solve the puzzle on the door and I can get out of here!

    Heck of a way to lock up a key, though...

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    Thanx so much elle.

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    HA! Cracked the code on the final lock!

    Don't think of the markings on the buttons as arrows, but as the hour and minute hands on a clock. If the numbers that show up are a time, how would the hands be positioned?

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    SonicLover Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 1:57 AM

    Locked Around the Clock Walkthrough

    The First Time Around

    1. You'll start facing the door, which is of course locked. Beside it is a panel which doesn't do anything... and apparently needs a key or something, which you don't have.

    2. To the left is a picture of a club that you can't do anything with, and below that is a chest of drawers. The first and third drawers down are locked, one with a key, the other with a code. The second and fourth drawers are empty.

    3. Hang on. The second drawer's rim looks unusually thick on one side. Look to the left of the drawers and open the second drawer from there to get your first inventory item, a remote control. Examine it and turn it over (click near its lower right) to see that it's missing a battery.

    4. Enough of this view; back away if necessary and turn right. You'll be facing a shelf with nine sections, as well as a wastebasket and two odd notches in the wall. The notches are insignificant for now, and there's nothing in or behind the wastebasket for now.

    5. So let's check the cabinets. The upper-left shelf contains a cup containing a ruler, pen, and pencil, and there's a spade marked on it. The cup is hexagonal, and so is the pencil; I'm going to go out on a limb here and say they're related. Check the flat end of the pencil for a number; write it down as the "spade number".

    6. The upper-middle shelf contains a U-shaped pipe with something stuck in it. You can look above it to see a pair of holes that lead to the pipe, but you can't do anything with them yet.

    7. The upper-right shelf contains some sort of piston, and something to the right. Click to look on the right side and see a button; when you press it, the screen shakes. It must make the piston slam down or something.

    8. The middle-left shelf's door is locked with a code you don't know yet. The middle shelf contains an alarm clock with Roman numerals (and no, you can't take the batteries from it for the remote; don't ask me why).

    9. The middle-right shelf contains the area under that piston from the upper-right shelf; it looks like it slams down to cut something that fits in that rectangular notch.

    10. The lower-middle shelf has a key you can't get do due to the glass protecting it. The lower-left and lower-right shelves contain irrelevant decorations.

    11. We've had enough fun with the shelves, so turn right again. There's a closet, which is locked with a strange-looking padlock. Something with a very particular shape must go in there.

    12. One more turn right and you'll be facing a cabinet with a TV on it. Underneath it are two drawers, a weird blue cylinder, and a cabinet that's locked with a four-digit code. One drawer contains a block of wood; the other is empty.

    13. Turn right again and you're facing the door again. Alright, it's time to stop staring at these puzzles and start solving them!

    The "In Japan" Drawer and the U-Shaped Tube

  • Let's take another look at the third drawer. "in JAPAN", three numbers, and "S-U-N". Try one of the letters and you'll find there are five choices: W, U, N, E, and S. Four of those are the four compass directions!

  • Now, the numbers. 7, 13, and 17 (the order can vary from game to game, but those are the numbers). Since this room is supposed to have a clock motif and the numbers don't go above 24, I'm going to guess they represent 24-hour times of day: 7 A.M., 1 P.M., and 5 P.M.

  • In the morning, the sun is to the east, and at late afternoon it's to the west. Since Japan is north of the Equator, the sun will be to its south at midday. That means 7 = E, 13 = S, and 17 = W.

  • If you did it right, you'll crack open the drawer and get an air pump. What can we do with this? I've got an idea. Go to the U-shaped tube in the top-middle shelf, look at it, and stick the air pump in the right hole. A good puff of air will send the tube's blockage flying.

  • Look behind the wastebasket by the shelf; it landed there. Take the capsule, open it, and retrieve the battery inside.

  • The TV and the Middle-Left Shelf

  • Now that you've got a battery, put it in the remote. Then, use said remote on the TV. You can press the four white buttons on the remote to view four different channels.

  • Huh? Each channel is a sequence of Roman numerals. If you trace them as paths on the face of the alarm clock on the shelf, they'll spell out shapes. "XII XII" is a special case; it means a circle.

  • Once you've deduced the four shapes, copy them to their corresponding positions on the door on the middle-left shelf. You should then be able to open it, revealing some sort of blue hook-thing. That stretches at both ends.

  • Turn over the blue hook-thing (click near its lower left edge) to see a heart. Stretch it at both ends again to see two digits; record them as the "heart number".

  • Making a Key for the Closet Lock

  • Go back to that middle-right compartment in the shelf of nine. The block of wood fits in that nook neatly, and I'd say the piston is supposed to cut it.

  • Go to the upper-right compartment, then hit the button to make the piston do its job. Go back to the middle-right compartment and retrieve your newly cut wood block.

  • I think I've seen something that shape will fit into. Go to the closet and use the wood block on the lock. Open sesame!

  • Inside the Closet

  • Now that you've got the closet open, take a look inside. It contains a few things of interest. That thing on the floor is the lock you just cracked open, but it's not important. Do, however, note the weird hole up above it.

  • Pull the white lever on the left to see the club picture on the opposite wall raise, revealing a cord and another number. The problem is that the lever doesn't stay down. Record the number, though, as the "club number".

  • There's also that diamond-shaped hole in the lower right, but you need something to use with it. The last thing worth noting here is that purple box, which contains a somewhat frustrating puzzle.

  • Here's how it works: each button moves two of the hands. The yellow hand always moves two steps clockwise with each press of its color, while the other two moves one step each. Your goal is to get all three hands to point at the top at the same time.

  • Here's a good strategy: use the red-yellow or blue-yellow button until the red and blue hands overlap, then press both of those buttons alternatingly until yellow is at the goal and red and blue are still overlapping. Then simply use the red-blue button until everything falls into place.

  • Once you get it, something should pop out of the side of the box. Check it out; it's a... pulley?

  • The Pulley and the Four-Digit Puzzle

  • The pulley goes in those two notches above the nine-compartment shelf. When you put it in place, a piece of paper will pop out. Three card suits plus a bunch of green and white lines equals...? That's weird.

  • Let's start with the card suits. By now you should have learned two one-digit numbers and a two-digit number corresponding to the suits. Put them in the order given on the paper and enter them on the door below and to the right of the TV.

  • That's not the combination, but it'll help visualize the next step. You need to add and subtract segments from those digits according to the green and white lines to turn the four digits into four new digits. Green means add, white means remove. Don't over-think it.

  • Once you've got your four new digits, input them and hit the ENTER button to open the door.

  • Winch Witchery

  • Inside the four-digit door you'll find a button. Hit it to make the blue cylinder turn. A key will fall out of it, so nab it. The key goes to the top drawer under the spade picture; you'll find a crank handle inside.

  • The crank handle goes to the diamond-shaped hole in the closet, which makes a rod slide out under the lever. Use the blue hook-thing (the one you got the heart number from, remember?) to secure the lever to the rod so it'll stay down.

  • Go back to the club picture and grab the cord that was behind it. This is the final piece to a puzzle you've been solving this entire time. Go use it on the blue cylinder, the pulley, or the holes above the U-shaped tube and the rest will be the done in a cutscene.

  • Once you're done admiring your handiwork, slap the button next to the blue cylinder to winch up the nine-compartment shelf. Then you can take the key underneath.

  • Clocking Out

  • The key goes to the panel by the door... revealing a set of arrowheads and a number. If you experiment, you'll see how this works: you're given a series of numbers and have to choose a direction for each one until the panel decides whether you've passed or failed.

  • Obviously, the clock motif is present her as well. Here's the trick: put a : into the number to make it look like a time, visualize that time on an analog clock, and pick the arrowhead that most resembles it. For instance, suppose the number is 725. When an analog clock reads 7:25, the hour hand is pointing down and left, and the minute hand is pointing down and right. Together they look like the up-pointing arrow, so hit it.

  • Once you get a perfect score on Locked Around the Clock's final exam, the door will open and you'll be free to leave. Victory!

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    outcastorange Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 1:57 AM

    This really was a tough one. I came here to the comments for help on the sun puzzle and the final solution. Talk about thinking outside of the box, you guys are really sharp!

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    I hated the puzzle in the closet (those kinds of puzzles and "lights out" type puzzles will always get a deduction from me), the "In Japan" puzzle was slightly annoying, there were a couple of click-location issues, and the last puzzle was partially guesswork even with the explanation from the walkthrough given that some of the clues could feasibly indicate two answers.

    All-in-all, I have to say this is the worst escaper I've seen here in quite awhile. Possibly the worst ever, but I don't entirely trust my memory on that.

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    I thought this was one of the best escape games for a long time. Although there were some pixel hunting, it didn't ruin the game. The puzzles were original and fun.

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    Puzzles were very challenging but pixel-hunting absolutely ruined this game. I hesitate to bad-mouth anyone who provides me with free entertainment, but I guess that's exactly what I'm doing.

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    Still having trouble with the four digit code.

    don't understand which of the green and white lines apply to which number. There's only three numbers from the clue so how do you get 4 digits from it?

    Very confused.

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    Ahhh. Got it. I didn't realize that

    the heart thing has 2 numbers

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    knotofnine Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 12:47 PM

    Hi all,

    Problem with the walkthrough -

    XII to XII is not a circle.

    Much headbanging before I figured that out.

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    knotofnine Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 1:06 PM

    Otherwise the walkthrough is really helpful!
    (Sorry - clicked submit too early with the last comment)

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    Before commenting on this game and others, I wish everyone in the JIG community happy holidays. I thank Jay for the best game site on the web, commend elle for working in overdrive lately, and appreciate SonicLover for
    discovering and writing walkthroughs of abstract games.

    At the start of playing this game and getting nowhere, and being an escape game aficionado, I decided to replay SuzumeDr's previous games to get a feel of the design. One thing in common of all the games is the un-intuitive places to click, almost to the point of mouse button failure because of pixel hunting. SuzumerDr's game design desperately needs a changing cursor, like Tomatea has, because places to click are not as obvious as a Tesshi-e creation. In the game To Nothing the pixel problem was the playing cards suits puzzle hidden behind the cabinet, and in the game Triangle it was knowing where to click after solving the Owl-Rooster puzzle. This game was no different in that respect. Once I get past the few hard to find places to click, the games move quite well. The puzzles are quite challenging, but not impossible. One just has to look for the not so obvious clues. Today's game has somewhat of a mini-game within, but nothing as time consuming as the Dice and Corridor mini-games inside of the Lift for Life game. Overall, I'm not a big fan of SuzumeDr's.

    While still being worthy of being featured on JIG, Locked Around the Clock is not even in my top 25 of this year's best. However, when I see SonicLover I do think of SuzumeDr's and Detarou, along with Picasso and Gaudi. I'm more of a Rembrandt and Renoir game player, or in a food analogy, I prefer a Bento Box over Jambalaya.

    Well, for those who are still reading this, I would like to share a few thoughts of this year's escape games, since we are near the end. I am very much impressed again with Tesshi-e and Tomatea, each with a dozen excellent games out so far this year. And, especially proud of Robamimi who has released 11 games so far this year, the most it ever has, and all of them excellent. I really like Hottategoya, I just wish the games were longer; all 10 of this year's games could be combined into one. Two new game developers this year, Haretoki and Libertechno deserve mentioning, and hopefully they will release more games next year. There is one game that simply stands out, not because it is the best overall this year, but the best that game developer Teralumina has ever created, Emerald Den Escape; it's just too bad they couldn't maintain the momentum.

    So, with just about three weeks left in the year, will a game be released that will put all others to shame?

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    I don't get the final puzzle at all, even with the explanations posted in the walkthrough. Some of them seem to have multiple possible directions?

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    luthy:

    Don't think of the buttons by the door as having arrows on them; think of those markings like the hands on a clock, with the point where they meet being the center of the clock.

    If the number showing were, for example, 1105, where would the hands of the clock be pointing at 11:05?

    The hour hand would point up and left, while the minute hand would point up and right.

    As such, they'd form a bit of a V shape, so for 1105 you'd press the button with the V marking on it.

    That help?

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    I have to agree with several on the site, that pixel hunt games are amongst my least favorite. I always feel like its a cheap way to add difficulty, like the impossible jump or slippery surfaces in platform games.

    Due to the fact that I don't really read the review before playing most games, I had no idea that there was a theme, and that the puzzles would be centered around this theme. That being said, I still don't feel like the "in japan" puzzle was very intuitive at all. Compass directions have nothing to do with the azimuth of the sun, really.

    I have a very, very hard time getting the remote to flip over so that I could insert the battery (probably about 20 different visits and 100 different clicks), and until I was told would not have figured out the wooden punch mechanism.

    What really sucks about games like this, for me at least, is that by the time I get into the groove, I start doing dumb things like forgetting that there were two slots in the wall for the pully, mostly because I'm so distracted by trying to click the pully 1000000 times to make sure there isn't a hidden pixel I might be missing.

    TL;DR: pixel hunting sucks, really distracts from puzzle solving.

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    i don't understand the

    4 digit puzzle. says something about adding and subtracting and i don't understand what it means.

    can someone help? obviously the solution is different every game, but please help.

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    i guess. i still don't get it. everything i try doesn't work.

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    SonicLover Author Profile Page December 5, 2012 8:26 PM

    @Paul: Can you post screenshots of the clues you've got? Maybe we can help you decipher them.

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    well i would but i forget how to show the picture here. do i need a special site to upload it?

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    Some of the puzzles have randomly generated components. I've stumbled across an unwinnable situation with the 4 digit combination.

    ... / ._. / ... / ...
    ._. / |_. / |.. / ...
    ._. / |_. / ..| / |..

    If the last three numbers (poorly shown) here are 1 2 and 9,
    WTF is the first digit??? (upside down U )


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    The puzzles in this are too obscure, but I do think it's worth playing through using the walkthrough.

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    LightWarriorK Author Profile Page December 6, 2012 10:40 AM

    While I agree with many of the above critiques, particularly when it comes to pixel huning and nonsensical puzzles ("In Japan," what??), after sitting back and thinking about it, I can appreciate what SuzumeDr is trying to pull off here.

    The escape genre is, for lack of a better term, stagnant. We see the same sort of puzzles time and time again. And while some may say that it defines the genre to have things hidden under pillows or wobbly pictures, or card suits, it can also be seen as resting on laurels. The lack of innovation can be boring.

    And points go where they're due, of course. Tesshi-e is always finding new things to do with Mr. Birdy and the Hippo, Robamimi has great devices, and Detarou is, well, Detarou. But I groan with every wobbly picture they use, and it's safe to bet that there's something under a piece of furniture that I need a long stick to get.

    So while SuzumeDr still has a ways to go, I can appreciate the effort to break out of the mold a bit, even if the attempts are frustrating at times. I'm hoping to see more of this sort, and hopefully the escape genre can learn from it a bit. Innovation may not be easy, or even successful, but it's important.

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    even then the walkthrough is complicated as far as the number puzzle. seems like suzumedr games are usually that way. oh well :(

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    confused on the final puzzle

    how can i visualize a time like "1040" when there's only left,right,up,and down. the omnly way is 3 6 9 and 12. i have no idea what's going on. Please help.

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    opening the battery compartment on the remote has defeated me... I don't care enough to keep trying I'm afraid!

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    I'm still having issues with the digital combination. I have 8531 and cannot figure which lines apply to which number. Can someone help ?

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