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Smile For Me


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Weekday Escape

JessI don't think I could describe Smile For Me, the sweet new escape game by Japanese designer Robamimi, any better than the game does itself: "This is escape game, but have not to escape. Sorry, you die please. You become a departed, and change to the smile the sorrowing bereaved." Says it all, don't you think?

Smile For MeOkay, okay, maybe not. To translate: in Smile For Me, you are a recently deceased person who, seeing the tears of a grieving loved one, seeks to bring joy to that individual. But how, exactly, are you going to accomplish that? In your new home, a silvery room high in the sky, you'll have to solve puzzles and use the heavenly tools at your disposal to bring a moment of happiness to your bereaved beloved. Awww.

I liked Smile For Me a lot. It's earnestly and unabashedly sentimental—which, in a world that at times seems to look down upon genuine emotion, is actually really refreshing. The puzzles are for the most part challenging without becoming overwhelming, though I did come across a few "seriously? you expected me to do that?" moments of eyebrow-raising "logic." Happily, a hint system is in place to bring you through those occasional bumps in the road. You'll also need to do a little math, so be prepared to pull out your calculator. Your reward for completing Smile For Me is a one of the nicest endings I've seen in an escape-the-room game, sweet and a little sad. You might find yourself genuinely moved.

The game is very well-crafted, with the excellent graphics we've come to expect from Robamimi as well as a mellow, melodic soundtrack. A save feature is provided, and a square mute button can be located above the inventory. Although the game is not heavy on pixel-hunting, be sure to check each and every clickable location (there are quite a few of them); if at some point you seem to be missing an important item from your inventory, rechecking previously visited areas will probably help. Also, on the game's title screen (after it has loaded), be sure to click "English" before you press "Play."

If you're in the mood to kill monsters and blow things up with comically oversized weaponry, this is not the game for you. If, however, you feel like you might like a breath of fresh air, a few minutes of unadorned sincerity to cleanse your palate (and a darn good escape game to boot), then click on the link below. It'll definitely make you smile.

Play Smile For Me

Walkthrough Guide


(Please allow page to fully load for spoiler tags to be functional.)

Smile For Me Walkthrough

Don't forget to click English unless you can read Japanese!

You are about to become very busy for a dead person.

  1. You should now be facing an odd-shaped bookcase that contains the following: four colored books, five brown books with unique symbols (teardrop, heart, triangle, diamond, and pentagon), and four decorative boxes with similar symbols (heart, triangle, diamond, and pentagon).

  2. On the bottom shelf of the bookcase look for a book that has a symbol like a teardrop. Open the book. Examine the picture and the symbols underneath. Notice that the arrow goes both ways.

  3. On the next shelf up find the book with a diamond on the cover and open it. Read the directions and make a note of 2 = 28 or 29.

  4. On the same shelf as the diamond book find the book with a heart on the cover. Read the book. 50,000 is a lot of balloons!

  5. Pick up the diamond box on the bottom row and click on the corner to turn it over. Note 7 x 8.

  6. Turn left. Examine the bulletin board closely. Back out.

  7. Turn left twice until you come to a table with a laptop on it. Click on the trashcan and take what's in it (a crank). Back out.

  8. Turn right. Attach the crank to the left side of the machine. The code for turning the cranks was in the teardrop book. First turn the cranks in this order: Left, Right, Left, Right, Right, Left. Take the capsule and open it. You now have a green fuse. Now turn the cranks in the reverse order: Left, Right, Right, Left, Right, Left. Take the capsule and open it. You now have a triangular key.

  9. Turn left. Click on the laptop for a close-up and take the object sitting on the keyboard. You now have a "pencil". Click on the "pencil" to open it. You now have a red fuse. Back out.

  10. Now click on the box next to the laptop. There are seven diamond shaped buttons in a row starting with a red one. These buttons represent days of the week starting with Sunday (red). Using the directions from the diamond book click in the following order: the "Tuesday" button (3rd from the left), the "Friday" button (2nd from the right) and the "Sunday" button (the red button on the far left). Screenshot. You now have an orange fuse. Whew! Being dead is hard work! Back out.

  11. Go back to the bookcase and open the triangle book with the triangle key. Look, it's a grid that exactly matches the bookcase. Make note of the position of the numbers. If you fill in each row with the color of the book in that row, the grid fills up. Red, blue, green, and orange. Now the numbers 1, 2, and 3 correspond to the letters g - o - d. Go to the triangle box, type in "god" and enter. A cyan fuse!

  12. Time to open the diamond box. 2=28 or 29 is the number of days in February (depending on the year). 7 x 8 stands for July and August, who both have 31 days. Multiply 31 x 31 and you get 961, the code for the diamond box. A yellow fuse!

  13. Now let's open the heart box. The heart shaped note on the bulletin board shows a balloon being divided by 1234. Divide 50,000 (the number of balloons released) by 1234. What you are looking for is the remainder, which is 640. Enter 640 into the heart box and take the pentagon key. Open the box again and click on the lining on the bottom inside of the open box. A purple fuse!

  14. Use the pentagon key to open the pentagon book. Remember the phrase "new our foot". There are 10 letters in the phrase "new our foot". Assign them numbers from 1 to 10, starting from the left (the "n" in new). Now go back to the bulletin board.

  15. Click on the bulletin board for a close up on the pentagon shaped memos. The first memo is 10, 3, 4. Substituting letters from the numbers from the "new our foot" code that spells t - w - o. The second memo is 8, 1, 2, o - n - e. The third memo is 7, 9, 5, 6, f - o - u - r. That spells out the code for the pentagon box, 214. Back up.

  16. Go back to the bookcase and open the pentagon box using the code 214. A blue fuse! You're in the home stretch!

  17. Go back to the table and look at the laptop. You need a password. Notice the three petal design (trefoil) on the laptop. Go back to the bookcase. Each book has a different number of trefoils on them, from 1 to 5. Go back to the letter grid from the triangle book. Find the spaces represented by the books and number them according to the number of trefoils. That should yield the letters a - n - g - e - l. A password!

  18. Go back to the computer and enter "angel" as the password. Click "check". Notice the fuse pattern clockwise from the top, red, orange, yellow, green, cyan, blue, purple. Back out.

  19. Turn left and click on the white object for a close-up. Click on the white square below the green light. Now place the fuses in the same pattern you saw on the computer screen. Back out.

  20. Turn right and look closely at the laptop. Click on the "fusion" button. Back out.

  21. Turn left and close up on the white object again. Open it and take out the rainbow fuse. Back out.

  22. Turn left and go to the top of the stairs. Throw the rainbow fuse to the sky. Done!

  23. Awww!

63 Comments

The connection seems to close a third of the way through loading (with dial-up). I've had this problem with the last game on this site as well. Is there a way to fully load this game without getting a faster connection?

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It looks like they have some copy protection going on in which the game SWF loads some additional file(s) during loading. That might be causing the problem, bluemoose. Sorry you're having trouble. :(

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Wisedude Author Profile Page June 24, 2009 1:11 AM

Wow, I don't think I would have gotten it without the in-game hints. Still, I loved it!

Heh, poor guy should get a proof reader.

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HSTwannabe June 24, 2009 1:20 AM

Having amassed three fuses and not knowing what to do with the "February" hint result, I am most stuck.

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HSTwannabe:

At least for me, the back of the diamond box said 7*8. 7=July, 8=August, both have 31 days. 31*31 = 961, which was the code for the box

Hope this helps.

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I hated it. Simple as that. This basically completes my hatred of Japanese games. They are way too "interpreative" without enough grounded logic. Vision is the best room escape and it isn't Japanese(I think) and it has real logic. I'm not saying American games always have logics, but Japanese games usually aren't as good in my opinion.

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Neutral, as per: http://neutralx0.net/home/privacy.html
Neutral is personal flash game site.
These games were made by Japanse flash creator Mya.

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phantomic bomb June 24, 2009 2:03 AM

hello~ I was having so much fun with this game, but for some reason I seem to have skipped the

red fuse

I have

all the other fuses, and I have put them in the rainbow machine thingy.

Help with finding the item I skipped?

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Smile For Me Walkthrough

Don't forget to click English unless you can read Japanese!

You are about to become very busy for a dead person.

  1. You should now be facing an odd-shaped bookcase that contains the following: four colored books, five brown books with unique symbols (teardrop, heart, triangle, diamond, and pentagon), and four decorative boxes with similar symbols (heart, triangle, diamond, and pentagon).

  2. On the bottom shelf of the bookcase look for a book that has a symbol like a teardrop. Open the book. Examine the picture and the symbols underneath. Notice that the arrow goes both ways.

  3. On the next shelf up find the book with a diamond on the cover and open it. Read the directions and make a note of 2 = 28 or 29.

  4. On the same shelf as the diamond book find the book with a heart on the cover. Read the book. 50,000 is a lot of balloons!

  5. Pick up the diamond box on the bottom row and click on the corner to turn it over. Note 7 x 8.

  6. Turn left. Examine the bulletin board closely. Back out.

  7. Turn left twice until you come to a table with a laptop on it. Click on the trashcan and take what's in it (a crank). Back out.

  8. Turn right. Attach the crank to the left side of the machine. The code for turning the cranks was in the teardrop book. First turn the cranks in this order: Left, Right, Left, Right, Right, Left. Take the capsule and open it. You now have a green fuse. Now turn the cranks in the reverse order: Left, Right, Right, Left, Right, Left. Take the capsule and open it. You now have a triangular key.

  9. Turn left. Click on the laptop for a close-up and take the object sitting on the keyboard. You now have a "pencil". Click on the "pencil" to open it. You now have a red fuse. Back out.

  10. Now click on the box next to the laptop. There are seven diamond shaped buttons in a row starting with a red one. These buttons represent days of the week starting with Sunday (red). Using the directions from the diamond book click in the following order: the "Tuesday" button (3rd from the left), the "Friday" button (2nd from the right) and the "Sunday" button (the red button on the far left). Screenshot. You now have an orange fuse. Whew! Being dead is hard work! Back out.

  11. Go back to the bookcase and open the triangle book with the triangle key. Look, it's a grid that exactly matches the bookcase. Make note of the position of the numbers. If you fill in each row with the color of the book in that row, the grid fills up. Red, blue, green, and orange. Now the numbers 1, 2, and 3 correspond to the letters g - o - d. Go to the triangle box, type in "god" and enter. A cyan fuse!

  12. Time to open the diamond box. 2=28 or 29 is the number of days in February (depending on the year). 7 x 8 stands for July and August, who both have 31 days. Multiply 31 x 31 and you get 961, the code for the diamond box. A yellow fuse!

  13. Now let's open the heart box. The heart shaped note on the bulletin board shows a balloon being divided by 1234. Divide 50,000 (the number of balloons released) by 1234. What you are looking for is the remainder, which is 640. Enter 640 into the heart box and take the pentagon key. Open the box again and click on the lining on the bottom inside of the open box. A purple fuse!

  14. Use the pentagon key to open the pentagon book. Remember the phrase "new our foot". There are 10 letters in the phrase "new our foot". Assign them numbers from 1 to 10, starting from the left (the "n" in new). Now go back to the bulletin board.

  15. Click on the bulletin board for a close up on the pentagon shaped memos. The first memo is 10, 3, 4. Substituting letters from the numbers from the "new our foot" code that spells t - w - o. The second memo is 8, 1, 2, o - n - e. The third memo is 7, 9, 5, 6, f - o - u - r. That spells out the code for the pentagon box, 214. Back up.

  16. Go back to the bookcase and open the pentagon box using the code 214. A blue fuse! You're in the home stretch!

  17. Go back to the table and look at the laptop. You need a password. Notice the three petal design (trefoil) on the laptop. Go back to the bookcase. Each book has a different number of trefoils on them, from 1 to 5. Go back to the letter grid from the triangle book. Find the spaces represented by the books and number them according to the number of trefoils. That should yield the letters a - n - g - e - l. A password!

  18. Go back to the computer and enter "angel" as the password. Click "check". Notice the fuse pattern clockwise from the top, red, orange, yellow, green, cyan, blue, purple. Back out.

  19. Turn left and click on the white object for a close-up. Click on the white square below the green light. Now place the fuses in the same pattern you saw on the computer screen. Back out.

  20. Turn right and look closely at the laptop. Click on the "fusion" button. Back out.

  21. Turn left and close up on the white object again. Open it and take out the rainbow fuse. Back out.

  22. Turn left and go to the top of the stairs. Throw the rainbow fuse to the sky. Done!

  23. Awww!

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I felt the "puzzles" were always one-off from being logical. It basically would have been impossible for me without the hints. And then it just felt like I was doing what I was told.

:-( And that makes me a sad panda.

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Anonymous June 24, 2009 2:56 AM

Wow. I've never felt the need to write a comment before, but this game used ridiculously abstract logic.

btw, I love the site. All these escape-the-room puzzles in one place!

For anyone who wants logical escape-the-room puzzles and hasn't tried all of them on this site, I recommend:

Lights, Vision, Sphere, Switch, RGB
Submachine 1,2,4 (I'm not a fan of 3 and 5)
Room Fake, Room Bath, Loom Above
Sagrarios Room
#07 ML

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Phantomic bomb -

The red fuse is in the pen (the game calls it a pencil) that is sitting on the laptop computer. Click on the top of the pen and it opens revealing the fuse.

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Well, it seems that I'm missing the yellow fuse. And the walkthrough that grinnyp posted doesn't mention where to find it. So, let's see....

2=28 or 29. February has 28 or 29 days. Now, 7x8 is the tricky one...

I just can't get it at all....

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I definitely agree with overzealous. I really struggled to make sense of each puzzle and relied heavily on the walkthrough to get me anywhere. And the

yellow fuse

was left out of the walkthrough. Couldn't figure this one out at all!

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That will teach me to post at 1 in the morning.

Yellow Fuse

Opening the diamond box. 2 = 28 or 29 is the number of days in february. 7 x 8 stands for July and August, which each have 31 days. Multiply 31 x 31 and you get 961, the code for the diamond box. Yellow fuse!

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Anonymous June 24, 2009 3:54 AM

The Yellow fuse puzzle is as follows:

Remember the hint, "2=28 or 29" meaning the days in February? So the numbers on the back of the Diamond box to be opened are "7x8" or "number of days in July multiplied by the number of days in August." That's 31 times 31, which equals 961.

Yeah, did not get the logic of these puzzles at all, and I play these games all the time.

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Really didn't like this game. The leap from puzzle to solution is too far for me. Maybe I'm stupid. Lol

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The walkthrough has been updated to include the yellow fuse puzzle. :)

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Why is the second diamond button friday, i don't get it...

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SD -

Okay, here's a longer explanation for the diamond button puzzle:

Clue one says "take two steps from the sun". The sun being Sunday, two steps from Sunday, or two days later, is Tuesday. Clue two says "take three steps backward from the Moon". The Moon is Monday (in Latin lunae dies, or day of the moon). Three steps (or days) backward from Monday is Friday. The third clue says "take two steps from there", aka two steps forward from Friday, which is Sunday. Does that make sense?

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It's pretty hard to me ^^
I couldn't solve it without the walkthrough
anyway this game is really cute
the text made me a little cry 'coz it reminds me of my xyz..

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Service temporarily available.

For quite some time now.

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Somehow, Ctrl+F5 did the trick for me. Or you could try the alternative site at http://robamint.seesaa.net/category/6488211-1.html

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JC Lisbon June 24, 2009 9:57 AM

The system is down! The system is down! Really, though, it should be required to mention in all room escape reviews whether or not they include pixel-hunting. That's always a deal breaker for me.

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"Service Temporarily Unavailable"

Hard to do a lot of smiling with that.

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Aerineth Author Profile Page June 24, 2009 10:19 AM

I think sometimes the difference in logic can be attributed to differences in culture, not that it necessarily applies to this game (which I am still loading).

As an example, the paper seals and marbles on Mystery House in Japan were completely illogical to Americans without exposure to that sort of thing. I managed to figure them out because I'd seen similar 'magic' paper seals in anime before. Commenters who read the language also added the translation for the seals and marbles which made the puzzle much clearer.

Then of course there are just weird leaps of logic in escape games in general sometimes, but that I think is international.

*checks*

Yeah, still loading. BUT it's making progress. Anyway. Postulating while I wait :)

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Yikes! A logic black hole. This was a little TOO abstract for me and only those puzzle geniuses will enjoy this one.

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Oh, I liked it -- it was hard, but not more so than many other games. The background "story" was very moving.

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The "logic-leap" for me was:

The heart puzzle. Okay, I got 50K divided by 1234. No sweat. It was one of the first things I tried. But to use the remainder of 640?

That was the one part when I needed the walkthrough. The rest I did myself, although I did have to use the in-game hints (which I usually ignore). I like Robamimi games, but this was my least favorite due to the quite obscure nature of the puzzles. I guess the dilemma escape-game designers face is criticism of "too easy" on one hand, or "illogical and unintuitive" if they increase the difficulty. I imagine it's quite a challenge to strike a good balance.

Just as an aside, one thing that has always baffled me: The investment of time and skill required to create well-crafted games must be substantial. When offering versions in different languages, why not utilize a competent translator before releasing it? You wouldn't have to hire a superb linguist. I mean, how hard would it be to show it to a person of that tongue and ask, "Is this the way it should read?" I guess I'd never want to see the funny translations go away entirely, because I get a kick out of them and it adds to the charm. But if any games designers are interested, I'm unemployed and looking for work. LOL!

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My sincerest admiration towards those how were/are able to go thru this game without any kind of help.
I could not get even close to half way even if i had a lifetime for it and a gun pointed at my head.
Reading some of the walkthru lines made me wonder if there are complete geniouses around who can actually walk these lines of contorted logic and I am a complete moron or not. Probably I am :)

I haven't got anything against this game, it's just way, way too hard for me. But I'm bound to think it's about me and not the game :)

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Sweet! The alternate link didn't have the connection issue. I'm in.

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Very cute, but thank God for the walkthrough. I pretty much gave up on puzzling it out on my own after the "2 = 28 or 29" clue was supposed to direct me to the diamond box. It requires jumping some pretty wide logical gaps: the clues are all there, but they're not connected clearly. And how did anyone figure out the final password? Using the bookshelves as a letter grid was genius, but man...

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I liked the game, although the logical leaps were to much for me. After a lot of getting nowhere, I resorted to the walkthrough. It would be nice to have more clues as to the theme of each puzzle. The music and the story were enough to keep my rating high for this game, as impossible as it was.

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private June 24, 2009 4:19 PM

the ending was SO cute... simply amazing!

JIG rulez!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(i know i spelled it wrong... i did it on purpose)

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boatshoes Author Profile Page June 24, 2009 4:24 PM

Some verrrrry iffy logic leaps...In game hints were pretty much necessary.

Like the balloon remainder? What's with that?

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boatshoes Author Profile Page June 24, 2009 4:25 PM

@bioLarzen: I feel your pain

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The walkthrough is wrong and now i'm confused. When it claims I get "the triangle key" I get the green fuse.

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Becky -

You use the cranks twice. Using the first pattern: Left, Right, Left, Right, Right, Left gives you the green fuse. Using the reverse pattern: Left, Right, Right, Left, Right, Left gives you the triangular key. I just went back and tried it, it still works.

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OK -- I always look forward to the Wednesday escape, but this one was just awful. Logic implies some sort of reasonable connection between the steps to a solution. Here we get a series of bizarre or obscure linkages instead. I got tired of depending on hints and gave up when I hit

new our foot

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Orietta June 24, 2009 6:02 PM

I keep getting a password error even though I'm putting in

'god'.

[edit: spoiler added. -eileen]

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@JonC:
Don't know if you meant it, but that sounded incredibly racist and ignorant. Especially since you are basically saying that only Americans use logic, and you pretty much generalized all Japanese games as crap. For your information, it's not that American games and such are more "logical," but rather, they tend to be much simpler. Maybe it's YOU that's not logical enough..? Anywho...

Sweet story, but incredibly difficult. I agree on the leaps of logic here. And I also definitely could not have finished it without in-game hints. I think I spent more time clicking for hints than I did solving puzzles! There were only a few I could do on my own... So because of that, I really didn't like this one. The ending was nice, and the graphics are very good, but it doesn't make up for the illogical puzzles.

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Orietta -

Are you just typing the three letters g o d into the triangle box? Or are you trying them somewhere else?

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Ewww... the logic leaps required here were atrocious. A few better connections in-game would have made this much more palatable, as the puzzles themselves were quite inventive.

Funny how different people have different dead ends.

I figured out "angel" long before I had the fuses... and got my capsules by randomly spinning cranks for a bit. :)

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SquidRock Author Profile Page June 25, 2009 11:06 AM

@NaoMi
For you to say that John C's comments were racist is a bigger stretch than the logic leaps in solving puzzles in this game. I understood perfectly what he was saying, although there are many Japanese games that I have thoroughly enjoyed playing. I don't know how you could have come up with your assesment of his comments. Sorry to be "going off" about this and I don't mean to be attacking you, but I guess I just don't like people throwing out the racist tag so freely. Anyway, the thing about this game is that it's no fun when even after reading the walkthru, there is no "aha" moment of clarity for the logic behind the puzzles. I'm glad to see that I am not the only person who found this game to be completely befuddling.

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For those of you wondering about the leap of logic required to solve the heart box puzzle, if you look directly underneath the room escape puzzle, there is a short explanation about

how to find the remainder of a division problem.

No Japanese needed to understand it. That was actually one of the only puzzles I figured out myself. Still, I agree with others who say the logic behind most of these puzzles was simply too far out.

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I really hated it. the connection of the symbols is way too abstract, makes the whole thing ridiculous. Didn't smile, just felt punked.

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Miketron Author Profile Page June 25, 2009 9:22 PM

2 = 28 or 29...

WTF

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Miketron Author Profile Page June 25, 2009 9:27 PM

But seriously, who would ever think to use modular division instead of regular? That game was ridiculous.

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architect.zero Author Profile Page June 26, 2009 1:30 PM

The puzzles weren't terrible, they were just extremely lateral, but the relationships between clues and their puzzles was tenuous.

For instance: new our foot

Considering the terrible translation, it looks like a mistake rather than a clue.

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what I want to know is,....how the heck do you get 640 from dividing 50,000 by 1234 ?

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sn -

640 is the remainder when you divide 50,000 by 1234. The remainder is what you have left over if something doesn't divide evenly (in whole numbers).

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Gotcha. Thanks grinnyp.
Yeah, you don't get the "remainder" when you do it on a calculator. Lol.

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penny lane June 27, 2009 11:00 AM

The logic in this was far fetched. None of it made sense. You can get through this without the hints.

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wow. nice onee( :

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@JonC:
VISION seems Japanese to me.

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florence Author Profile Page July 9, 2009 10:37 AM

the ending was really cute ^^

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not a escape game but really cute.

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nerdypants Author Profile Page August 23, 2009 10:25 PM

Remainders. Wow. It's been a while.

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All the puzzles made sense to me. If you're talking about

the diamond puzzle box on the table, and the hints about the sun and the moon

, you'd have to know some Japanese to see the connection.

The days of the week represent different things:
Sunday = Sun
Monday = Moon
Tuesday = Fire
Wednesday = Water
Thursday = Wood
Friday = Gold
Saturday = Earth

Making it one of the easiest puzzles if you have some knowledge of Japanese.

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That was almost ridiculously complex.

And yet...I smile. :D

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Even with the walkthrough, I have no idea how to get

the letters g-o-d. What does it mean "fill up the grid"? The one in the book or the bookcase itself? And fill it up with what???

Whatever. I'll just pretend I know what it's talking about. >.<

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Chiktionary Author Profile Page November 25, 2009 7:11 AM

Andi wrote:
That was almost ridiculously complex.

And yet...I smile. :D

Yep. :)

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