June 2003 Archives


| Comments (2) | Views (1)

A major Supreme Court decision handed down today reverses a 1986 high court decision upholding state anti-sodomy laws. Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote for the court's majority:

"The petitioners are entitled to respect for their private lives. The state cannot demean their existence or control their destiny by making their private sexual conduct a crime."

Ruth Harlow, of the Lamda Legal Defense and Education Fund, the group that represented the defendants in the case, had this to say:

"This is a very strong ruling that we all, as individuals -- whether gay or straight -- have the liberty to choose who we'll love and how we'll do that in the privacy of our own homes..."

Of course the hate-mongers were also out today in full force condemning the decision. Even Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas dissented, saying "The court has largely signed on to the so-called homosexual agenda."

I say there is no homosexual agenda other than for equal rights for all individuals, and that's not a concept the homosexual can claim as her own -- it is a consititutional right that all individuals "are created equal."


| Comments (0) | Views (1)

Been reading the gaming news lately? If so, you're probably familiar with the recent rift within the Microsoft XBox subsidiary in Japan over layoffs. Seems that severely poor sales of XBox hardware and software in the land of the rising sun has lead to a 17% reduction in staff at the company. Sounds like everyday news? Guess again.

Only recently has the concept of company jobs being temporary been introduced in Japan, it's been customary and tradition to have a company job for life. So you need to imagine what it must feel like for someone in Japan to suddenly find themself without a job. As many Americans can agree, the feeling of being laid-off is nothing short of devastating. The misery-loves-company comfort in knowing so many others have gone through the same thing is a 'luxury' the Japanese do not share.

Adding insult to injury would best describe what subsequently happened to those unfortunate XBox employees: once informed of their termination they were not allowed to speak to the other employees, and were escorted off the premises. Ouch!

And though this does not seem unusual behavior to our Western society, it has caused quite a stir in Japan and has tarnished the already languishing image of the XBox there. The business-as-usual tactics of Microsoft will not soon win over Japanese culture. Furthermore, will our Western culture ever realize that treating people poorly and without respect is bad karma? Are we all too desensitized to worry about nurturing our souls? Or is there truth in the saying "what doesn't kill us makes us stronger?"


| Comments (0) | Views (0)

From Telecoms.com, a very poignant article (registration required to read) about the beginning of the end of the planned obsolesence cycle of game consoles...

"...So the PS2 will live on as a component in Sony CE products long after the computer entertainment division has introduced the PS3. With an already huge installed base, moves such as this will only help widen the demographic spread. There is a downside for Sony: For the first time, developers and publishers can probably afford to ignore the new hardware and make a good living from older hardware.

But the strategy works for Sony. In a few years, it will be able to offer a full range of computer entertainment products: a high-end PS3, the venerable PS2 in stand-alone and embedded forms, and handheld and toy-form PS1s.

Nintendo, which has relied on each new hardware being a whole new product with little backward compatibility, must take stock of its strategy. Microsoft might have to consider that the already high-powered Xbox could be a better bet in the medium term than an even-more-powerful Xbox 2."

Sony's expertise in consumer electronics has established them as quite the formidable foe, and Microsoft with its multi-billion dollar bankroll at its disposal will not soon concede without a fierce battle. It is Nintendo that I fear for the most with it's relative naivety when compared to the others. While I believe Nintendo knows game play better than any other player in the games industry, it will be Sony's hardware prowess and Microsoft's money that brings Nintendo down in the long run. Please prove me wrong.


| Comments (0) | Views (0)

A wonderful piece on gossip by Professor Liz Lawley brought me to the connection it has with Open Source from reading the latest in the developing saga between SCO and IBM. For the uninitiated, SCO is suing Big Blue to the tune of 3 billion dollars over SCO's intellectual property, "Unix System 5 code, showing up directly inside of Linux." The suit has wide ranging implications and significance to the Open Source movement, to Linux, and to the many businesses incorporating Linux into their infrastructures.

But what does that have to do with gossip? There was a very illuminating interview on CNet's news.com yesterday with Darl McBride, CEO of SCO Group, where he said:

"The point about open source that I believe is really cool is this notion that you have thousands of eyes around the world looking at a similar problem, and obviously when you have more people focused on something, you can solve things better."

Relating to gossip, there is an element of people working together towards common goals through: understanding one another, identifying with one another within the relative social structure, assisting one another through contacts and networking, and otherwise simply problem solving.

Therefore as more people gossip on a topic isn't it more likely there will be a beneficial or productive outcome? I can think of jobs that were found for friends faced with hardship, even new relationships or friendships for those who were treated badly by others, and with gossip as an attributing factor. My mother always told me "there is strength in numbers", and I can see gossip as a medium through which this concept manifests.


| Comments (0) | Views (0)

Father's day at the Burris house and it was nice to see everyone again, as it was just Memorial Day that we did it last. Though this time there were a few different faces and some that were absent, it still feels good to get so many family peeps together for some sun and nice conversation. The picture to the right was taken over Memorial Day and includes my nieces Kelley and Lindsey, sister Tamara, and brother-in-law Mark.

Thanks Dad for the photo, though I would still like to get the other one of the Sidoti clan, and yes I was able to find a program to un-stuffit, in fact Aladdin Systems is now multi-platform! yippy!


| Comments (0) | Views (4)


| Comments (3) | Views (3)

they say you stand by your man,
tell me something i don't understand.
you said you loved me and that's a fact,
and then you left me said you felt trapped.
well some things you can't explain away,
but the heartache's with me to this day.

did you stand by me?
no not at all.
did you stand by me?
no way.


| Comments (3) | Views (0)

Nintendo announced today there will be two (2) new colors available for the Game Boy Advance SP in September to commemorate sales of 1.1 million units of the system since launch: Flame & Onyx.

Sweet! I've been using a Platinum SP since its launch, and though I am very pleased with the color as it makes the device look metallic, it also tends to be on the reflective side making playing in the sun very difficult.


| Comments (1) | Views (1)

World renowned artist, Spencer Tunick, as reported by CNN has done it again: by assembling more than 7,000 nude bodies this morning on an avenue in Barcelona, Spain, he exceeded his largest previous gathering of about 4,500 in Melbourne, Australia, in 2001 (photo to the right). It is marvelous to see such compassion and participation for his work around the globe, himself being a New York native, and in such contrast to the perception of the nude in the US where he has been arrested five times for working with nudes in public. This itself is a reflection of the contrast between his nude bodies and that of the urban backgrounds of his photographic compositions.

This is exciting stuff! What is wrong with US?


| Comments (2) | Views (2)

The folks over at Poochkiss write...

"Ever notice that just about everyone who has a website acts -- at some point in time -- as if they're a usability expert?"

I say... after years of having to use Microsoft products the masses have become well versed in what does not work, and have learned to identify shoddy interface design more as a means of survival. The critic part simply comes from being fed up with having to deal with said interfaces, thereby sounding the alarm for comrades in arms.


| Comments (0) | Views (1)

Ever since my friend Jason Markham and his brother Steve introduced me to the wonderment that is a digital video recorder (DVR), which was then called Dish Network's PersonalTV system some 6 years ago, I have marvelled at what TV is becoming. And because I'm not one of those people who just happens to find themselves in front of the television at the same time each evening, I never seem to be able to partake in conversations at social gatherings that start off like: "hey, did you catch this week's... something-or-other?" And though I believe few of the offerings on the tube are worthy of my attention, not to mention able to maintain my attention, there are some productions which simply should not be missed.

Enter the DVR. This is one device that everyone, bar none, will wonder how they ever friggin got along without one. And for most the options are few but shaping up to be quite dependable: Tivo and ReplayTV. Both companies sell DVRs and both are holding their own and doing quite well. Chances are you have yourself even looked into these mystical little boxes. And if you're a geek and know a little about Linux, you can now build one of these little devices yourself and have ALL the features, even those that Tivo and ReplayTV cannot provide (like 30-second skip for commercial bypass) for fear of pissing off the powers that be.

Enter MythTV: a completely free software package for home-brewed DVRs, which even sports a graphical user interface, support for multiple tuner cards, fetches television programming guides off the net, archives shows to video CD (VCD), and more. Isaac Richards launched MythTV about a year ago and, with the help of several other hackers, is close to finishing a complete solution -- though there are many who have the system up and running now and working just fine.

When I get the time... MythTV is gonna be mine. Thanks to Wired for running the story which lead me to Richard's site.


| Comments (1) | Views (1)

A federal appeals court today ruled that video games are indeed protected under the first amendment of the US Constitution:

"If the First Amendment is versatile enough to 'shield [the] painting of Jackson Pollock, music of Arnold Schoenberg, or Jabberwocky verse of Lewis Carroll,' we see no reason why the pictures, graphic design, concept art, sounds, music, stories, and narrative present in video games are not entitled to a similar protection," the court said in its ruling. "The mere fact that they appear in a novel medium is of no legal consequence."

This reverses a controversial earlier court ruling that sought to limit access to mature games. Thanks to CNN Money for running the story.


| Comments (0) | Views (1)

Fighting to protect her privacy, Barbara Streisand is in the news over at The Smoking Gun regarding her lawsuit against Kenneth Adelman's internet distribution of high definition photographic images of the California coastline which happen to include her elegant Malibu estate. The suit claims the photos undermine Streisand's diligent attempts to protect her privacy and herself from "unwanted intrusion into her domestic environment" and otherwise "shield her private life from public view." The suit further claims that Adelman is flippant and uncooperative with respect to Streisand's privacy concerns.

While I agree that photographic images of the California coastline should not be considered the private property of those who own the property contained in them, a search on Adelman's website for "streisand" will yield the photograph of Streisand's estate. This from a website whose intended purpose is "to create an aerial photographic survey of the California Coast and update it on a periodic basis."

Is a survey of the coastline truly Adelman's intent and purpose and not to profit from her name (as well as from the names of others)? The photograph is even labeled "Streisand Estate, Malibu."

It will be interesting from a privacy issue perspective to see how this whole thing pans out.


| Comments (3) | Views (1)

Two landmark decisions were made with respect to web browsers this week: AOL Time Warner agreed to settle their lawsuit and cooperate with Microsoft over licensing MS browser and digital media technologies; and Microsoft announced that it will abandon standalone versions of its browser, Internet Explorer, forcing you to upgrade your OS to get the latest version of IE.

I have grown quite accustomed to using Netscape, being a welcome alternative to Microsoft's product, and I know there are others out there that feel the same way. What impact will all this have on Netscape & Mozilla, both of which are owned by parent company AOL Time Warner?


| Comments (0) | Views (1)

John C. Dvorak wrote an interesting article last week for PC Magazine entitled "Blogs: The Next Big Thing" where he draws on similarities between the CD-ROM business and the dot-com phenomenon to conclude that blogging is about to hit mainstream awareness. At the heart of the similarities are the Mac, San Francisco, and Microsoft. An interesting read, if nothing else.

Recent Comments

 

Display 5 more comments
Limit to the last 5 comments

Casual game of the week

Fear for Sale: The 13 Keys

Your Favorite Games edit

add
Save links to your favorite games here. Use the Favorites editor.

Monthly Archives

Legal notice

All games mentioned or hosted and images appearing on JayIsGames are Copyright their respective owner(s).

All other content is Copyright ©2003-2014 JayIsGames.com. All Rights Reserved.


Visit our great partner: maxcdn!